Tyrosine benefit capsule 500 mg per pill, review of benefits and side effects, use for alertness and mood disorders including depression

Tyrosine is not an essential amino acid since tyrosine can be made from the amino acid phenylalanine. It can be converted into dopamine,  a chemical that enhances female libido and is influenced by supplements and norepinephrine.

Tyrosine benefit of supplementation
Depression
Phenylalanine and tyrosine are sometimes prescribed as antidepressants, usually in combination with other nutrients and herbs that have mood elevating properties.

Parkinson's disease
Can L Tyrosine can be used in place of or in addition to Carbidopa for Parkinson's disease?
   It is not an effective supplement for those with Parkinson's disease. We have no experience using it as an add on to Carbidopa, so we don't know.

What benefit you will notice
Most individuals who take either of these amino acids notice improved alertness, mental arousal, and mood, and slight loss in appetite.

buy Tyrosine 500 mg pill
Supplement Facts
L Tyrosine - 500 mg per capsule

If you plan to buy tyrosine, limit your dose initially to a third or half a capsule until you find out how it reacts in your system.


 

Mood disorders, depression
Antidepressants have induced anhedonia. Do tyrosine pills correct anhedonia?
   It is unlikely to make a major difference in the vast majority of users but some may notice mood enhancement.

Q. I have mild depression and depersonalisation and had to start St Johns wort which caused me a lot of arrythmias and feelings of mania, restlessness-at least now the symptoms are gone. I had to cut them down and my depression got much worse but now I am thinking to get some l-tyrosine-would you say 250 mg could possibly help me? I am also taking 500 mg l-lysine which calms me down. Do you think their combo is a bad idea?
   A. We can't predict any person's response to supplements. L Tyrosine may help some people with depression, but there are other supplements that could also help such as SAM-e and 5-HTP. It is important to use low dosages since these supplements can have side effects when taken in high dosages. We are not aware of any bad interaction between lysine and tyrosine supplements.

Thyroid gland
Q. Are there concerns to take tyrosine and kelp - when taking Amour or Synthroid? When I discontinued L- Tyrosine or L-Phenylalanine) and Kelp I felt sluggish. Does L-Phenylalanine have the same interactions and/or concerns as L- Tyrosine and Kelp when taking Amour or Synthroid ?
   A. It depends on the dosage used and your overall health and function of thyroid gland. Phenylalanine and tyrosine pills have a similar effect.

Weight loss
Some doctors recommend these amino acids for appetite control. Phenylalanine may trigger the release of an appetite-suppressing hormone in the gut called cholecystokinin. A combination of ginger, cinnamon, green tea extract, spirulina, acetyl-l-carnitine, choline, guggul, and several other herbs and nutrients, as found in Diet Rx, a very effective herbal diet pill for weight loss. Users of Diet Rx have lost several pounds within a week or two.

Conversion and metabolism
Phenylalanine to Tyrosine to L Dopa to Norepinephrine to Epinephrine.

I'm a little confused about which neurotransmitter is most directly affected by L-tyrosine, norepinephrine or dopamine? I guess I'm wondering if mimics something like Effexor or Paxil more closely?
   Taking a L tyrosine supplement causes alertness. It converts to dopamine but it can convert to several other substances. Taking it is not a reliable or efficient way to provide dopamine. 5-HTP mimics Paxil more closely.

Remeron mirtazapine
Is it safe to keep taking l tyrosine while on prescribed Remeron medication?
   Remeron is the product name for mirtazapine, an antidepressant that became available in 1997. Remeron is used for moderate or severe depression, for treating anxiety, motor retardation, and cognitive and sleep disturbances associated with depression. It has a tetracyclic chemical structure that makes it different from other common antidepressants (SSRIs, MAOIs, and tricyclics). While stimulating norepinephrine and serotonin release, Remeron also blocks two specific serotonin receptors. When combining supplements and medications, potential side effects are mostly dependent on the dosage used and the person taking the supplement. Many factors are involved and what works for one person may not work for another. A low tyrosine dosage may cause no side effects, but a higher one could.

Side effects, risk
Can one overdose on 500 mg L-Tyrosine on a daily basis for one month or two? What side effects might be expected? I've learned so much from your website already.
   Yes, tyrosine can cause heart rhythm problems along with feeling jittery, restless and anxious. We suggest those with moderate to severe
hypertension not to use it.

Have you heard any reports of it causing fatigue or sedation?
   It could interfere with sleep and hence with repeated use could cause fatigue or sedation due to lack of deep sleep.

I have been taking 500mg a day of L-Tyrosine in combination with 500 mg of Para Thyrolate, and vitamin B (as prescribed by a nutritionist.) Also, I have high blood pressure and have been taking hydrocholorathiazide for the past two years. I had a Grand Mal Seizure followed by a second one 5 hours later. I have never had a seizure before in my life and I am 36 years old. The day of the seizure I had been feeling like I was coming down with a cold or flu and barely ate anything all day. I have been reading up on the side effects of L-Tyrosine and realized that I have been experiencing side-effects for quite some time; heart palpitations and what appeared to be mini panic attacks. Has L- Tyrosine ever been documented to cause seizures? At the hospital they ran lots of tests and could not seem to find anything wrong with me so the seizure remains unexplained.
   Although we have not come across any published studies regarding its role in seizure inducement, we can not rule out the possibility, that, in some people, it is possible that high doses of l tyrosine could reduce the threshold for a seizure to occur. This is just speculation since we have not seen actual research on this topic.

Q. I have often thought that I have hypothyroidism because it runs in my family. I have a lot of the symptoms too. So, I took L Tyrosine for a couple of days and I started getting hot flashes. So I stopped but the hot flashes continued and now it has been over 2 weeks. I was supposed to start menstruating around the same time but it hasn't happened yet. I'm wondering if I kick started my body into menopause by speeding up my thyroid. Have you heard of anything like that before? And, if so, should I start up the L Tyrosine again in smaller doses for the hypothyroid symptoms?
   A. Tyrosine can elevate body temperature but this should go away within a day or two or a few days after stopping it. We can't make recommendations whether to restart or not take the l tyrosine supplement since that is a decision you and your doctor would need to make.

Q. I wanted to inform you that I took a yohimbe bark supplement in the evening. That morning I had taken 500 mg of a tyrosine pill. Soon after I took the herb, I noticed rapid heart beat. I had not had this effect as much with the tyrosine supplement alone.

Long term use, habituation, tolerance
I am 31 years old from India. I used to feel extremely restless and anxious all the time, thoughts racing every time in my mind . i used to feel tired and depleted. then i started taking l-tyrosine 500 mg I tablet in the morning empty stomach and the results were nothing short of a miracle. i felt better  and also added vitamin b6 (p5p) 20 mg and fish oil and vitamin D3 2000 i.u .after taking them for 4 months i continue to feel better BUT I felt very sleepy. I have stopped all supplements now except tyrosine 500 mg but whenever i take it in the morning i feel very sleepy what should i do?
   Sometimes it is a good idea to take a break from all supplements and then restart using a different one that has a similar effect. Tolerance could develop.

I have been taking a 500mg dose of l-tyrosine 1-2 times per week, finding it to be very effective at giving me a mental quickness and focus on the days when I need those advantages the most. However, I’m slightly worried about the long-term effects of taking this dose over a sustained time-frame. Do I face any additional side effects (beyond those normally attributed to it) by taking it over a long time period?

Q. Are Sam-e, L-Tyrosine, L-Phenylalanine, L Tryptophan, habit forming?
   A. There is no evidence that these supplements are habit forming.

Comparing to N acetyl-tyrosine
Q. Tyrosine even at 1200 mg doesn't do much for me (minor concentration boost) and I find that it puts more of a lid on my functioning if I take it for more then a day or two at a time, not to mention it only seems to help for about 2 hours. N-Acetyl Tyrosine has been said to be more potent (what dosage of regular Tyrosine compared to the Acetyl version) and marketing for it says that it is more stable, does that mean that it will stay in the blood stream longer?
   A. We have not seen scientific comparisons between acetyl tyrosine and regular tyrosine, but the dosage of acetyl tyrosine may be a third or quarter of the tyrosine dosage in many people. We don't find tyrosine to be as good a mind booster as some of the other supplements.

Questions
I started taking 500 mg once a day. After about 2 months, I noticed that a lymph node began to appear in my throat area, I discontinued using the tyrosine, and the lymph node went away. When my
fibromyalgia symptoms reappeared after about 1 year. I decided to try it again. I began the 500 mg dose again for another 2 months, and then one morning I awoke to a swollen neck on the right side. After months of tests to rule out everything from thyroid disease to Lymphoma, they could not find anything. But I remembered that the Tyrosine had caused the lymph node from before. Ever since then I discontinued it. Why would it seem like the amino acid caused these symptoms? Would a smaller dose be more beneficial because when I did use the Tyrosine, I did not suffer from any other symptoms, and it did help me feel better.
   This is interesting, this is the first we have heard of this connection between tyrosine and lymph node enlargement.

Q. I have read alot on the site about the cautions of 5-HTP and would like to ask about whether there are any risks of using L-Tyrosine in the long-term. For me, this supplement really helps with my mood but I would like to know whether the amino acid is safe for daily consumption at a high dose(12 grams). I do not experiences any side-effects from this amino acid and have not read any reports of toxicity ever occurring from its use.
   A. Twelve grams of tyrosine is a very high dose. Side effects could include irritability, anxiety,  heart irregularities and perhaps  over the long run could have a pro oxidant effect on certain brain cells, but this is just my hypothesis. Tyrosine seems to be more effective in those whose depression is due to low dopamine levels. It's probably best to not use one particular nutrient to treat depression for prolonged periods but to alternate different ones such as St. John's wort, SAMe, 5-HTP, etc.

Q. There is a tanning pill called pro tan e-z caplets with 1000mg of l-tyrosine in them. Could you tell me (before I decide to make my purchase of them) if this is a safe dose? It says it is ephreda free also. I would like a professional opinion before my l tyrosine purchase. That way I can decide if pro tan e-z caplets is a good purchase as a tanning pill.
   A. L-tyrosine, in dosage greater than 300 or 500 mg, may, in some people, cause heart rhythm problems, anxiety, and restlessness. We have not seen any evidence that taking a tyrosine supplement helps with tanning. You may wish to ask the company selling this product to show scientific papers that their product enhances tanning and does so safely.

Q. I suffer from severe M.E. and have a border line thyroid function test and low DHEA. I felt better at first on the natural thyroid Westhroid which my doctor prescribed but then started with palpitations and pain at the back of my neck at night and some strange sensations in my chest. I heard about Thyrosine and after surfing the web read many sites talking about thyrosine and tyrosine. My question to you is are these two substances the same thing? I want to know if Thyrosine and tyrosine are one and the same first.
   A. We had not heard of thyrosine before, but a search on the internet shows it is the name of a product that has many different ingredients. Therefore, Thyrosine and tyrosine are not the same thing.
 

Q. Q. I read info for brain production of dopamine for obesity, specifically over eating on a medical doctor's website. "Nutritional supplements can have a positive effect on brain dopamine levels and help with focus and energy. I often have my patients take a combination of of tyrosine (500-1,500 milligrams two to three a day), OPC grape seed or pine bark (1 milligram per pound of body weight) and gingko biloba (60-120 milligrams twice a day). These supplements help increase dopamine and blood flow in the brain and many of my patients report that they help with energy, focus and impulse control." Is N-Acetyl Tyrosine better than L-tyrosine?
   A. Some people prefer tyrosine others prefer N acetyl tyrosine. It is best, when combining different medications or supplements, to first learn how each one works for you by itself in order to prevent potential side effects with the combinations.


 

Q. I've been experimenting with different vitamins, minerals, and herbs for about 10 years now to avoid synthetic medications, and I seem to have found a combination that works for me. One of the supplements I take is tyrosine, and I've been reading a lot lately that lower doses such as under 300mg are probably better. I take 1000 mg a day (and have been for years now) with short breaks of a few days once every month or two, and I've never had a problem with it. It is when I stop taking it for longer than about a week that I have what I call withdrawals, and start getting many of the symptoms that people report when they take too much of it, along with depression, OCD, and either insomnia or sleeping too much. I also take 500mg of taurine, 100mg of 5-HTP, 200 mcg of chromium picolinate, 1000mg of Omega-3, small amounts of ginkgo and DMAE, a good B-complex, and B-12. These are to help with bipolar, symptoms of ADD, such as poor memory, poor attention span, and feeling "foggy" (debilitatingly so), and to help with symptoms of hypoglycemia. My moods remain consistently stable when I maintain this regimen, I feel comfortably alert, my memory is better, and I don't have any issues with low blood-sugar levels. I'm writing because I'm curious about a few things, and if you're able to answer any of these questions I'd be most grateful! Am I taking too much tyrosine, even though anything less than 1000mg a day doesn't seem to do much of anything for me? I know each person is different, but I'm wondering if there's an amount that is too much, and if there's a drawback to taking it for extended periods of time, such as years. Also, why in the world would I have the opposite reaction to other people? Is that even heard of? And if you happen to know if this combination of supplements is harmful in any way, I would love to find that out too.
   A. Each person's body chemistry is different and therefore one has to find out through trial and error which supplements and in what dosages and combinations are most helpful. Long term studies with tyrosine supplements in terms of treatment for many months or years have not been done and therefore it is difficult to predict what kind of potential side effects may occur. Taking breaks from supplements certainly reduces the risk of the adverse effects. People do have quite varied effects to the same supplement or medications, including caffeine. Some people are able to drink coffee at night and sleep well whereas for most others caffeine will keep them awake.
      Q. Thank you so much for writing back. This information is helpful for my peace of mind! Funny you should mention caffeine - I'm one of those people who can sleep fine after consuming it. I will continue to "listen" to my body, and try to stay updated on research as I always have.

I am interested in a product Mind Power Rx with Bacopa, one of the ingredient is tyrosine - I have/ had cancer, is it OK to to take a supplement that contains tyrosine.
  The amount of tyrosine is small and we have not seen any human studies with such supplements to indicate any issues with cancer.

I am a 53 year old Menopausal woman with Hashimoto disease and fibromyalgia. I take Synthroid. My TSH is therapeutic. However, I have fuzzy brain and a low grade depression. I also have terrible aches everywhere. I sleep terribly, between the aches and pains and hot flashes I’m fairly miserable. I am also post adenoid cystic cancer parotid gland 5yrs survival. My question is I have read about both 5-HTP and tyrosine as possible supplements could one of them help? Would they interfere with the Synthroid? I’m particularly sensitive to meds and generally start off with the lowest of all possible doses. I would appreciate any suggestion you have as I would very much like to enjoy this time in my life…I’ve already been reminded how short it can be.

I have been taking Neuroreplete supplements for about one month for depression. The doses of 5- htp and tyrosine are much higher than other websites advise to take. I have coronary artery disease; % 50 LAD obstruction. Dr. Hinz says that Neuroreplete is very safe and I can securely take them. I am on level 3 now. So, I take about 900 mg of 5- htp and high amounts of tyrosine. Do you think that Neuroreplete may be dangerous for me; should I stop it ? I am frightened after reading advices on 5- htp and tyrosine in terms of using lower dosages.
    This is a decision you and your physician have to make.

I recently began taking L-Tyrosine for my depression and found your website and information extremely helpful. I was wondering how necessary it was to take B6 and copper for absorption. I am also taking Flax Oil, Omega 3's, Green Tea and St. John's wort.
    B6 pills and copper are not necessary to take as supplements in order for tyrosine pills to be effective. However one has to be careful mixing too many supplements due to excess energy, alertness, rapid heart rhythm and insomnia.

I'm wondering about the safety of l-tyrosine for nursing mothers. My daughter is still nursing her 9 month old son and is interested in trying this supplement for help with ADD. She is attempting to continue her education, but is fearful that her ADD will interfere with this pursuit.
    We have not seen such studies regarding the use of this amino acid while nursing.
If taken occasionally it should be safe for the child but it is difficult to give a precise answer without studies being published.

About 15 years ago a psychiatrist prescribed a 500 mg dose of l-tyrosine to me for assistance with insomnia – it worked very well though gave me quite vivid dreams (but not nightmares). Over the years, I have gone back to L-Tyrosine as a sleep aid because it is not only not heavy handed but actually helps me feel better in the morning – not unlike the descriptions of 5 HTP. I have always wondered a) is L-Tyrosine used or suggested as a sleep aid in general (I have rarely ever seen that in my reading on the subject) and b) are the vivid dreams (others I have suggested it to have experienced similar vivid dreams) a by-product of the tyrosine?
    Tyrosine is more likely to cause insomnia rather than help with sleep. Vivid dreams have been mentioned by others.

My daughter is 19 years old and a first year college student. When she was in high school, every year starting around February and lasting a couple months she would have difficulty focusing on homework, would be emotional and just generally sort of "down". At the time we lived in western Pennsylvania. Now she is in Florida and in college - and is having the same problem. She is an "A" student so having difficulty studying and staying focused on her school work is very upsetting to her. Is L-Tyrosine used for this sort of "ailment"? and, if so, what does would a 19 year old start with? If this is not something that would be appropriate, what would be?
    It may be that she has seasonal affective disorder and certain natural supplements that are used for depression could potentially be of benefit.

What have you seen positive and negative affects l-tyrosine has on treating ADD (attention deficit disorder)? I read on a website that this natural amino acid can cause cancerous skin moles since it is involved creation of moles. I was wondering if you have heard this and if so, could you comment on this association.
    There have been a few people with adult ADD ADHD who have noticed some benefit from this natural amino acid supplement. We are not aware of any studies regarding an increase in skin cancer or moles from the use of tyrosine, although hardly any long term studies have been done with this nutritional supplement.

I am doing an article on Gilberts Syndrome and have run across many people with it that have "white-spots" (no pigment?) on their shins and thighs. Could supplementing with Tyrosine reverse this spotting. Since natural Tyrosine is produced by the Liver and people with Gilbert's have over bilirubin production, from their Liver. Could this be causing the Liver to not produce the Tyrosine it should?
    We doubt that supplementing with this amino acid reverse the spotting but this is not an area we have studied in any detail.

My 7 year old daughter suffers with sometimes debilitating tics and comorbid symptoms. PANDAS was considered and the results of a study show elevated Cam Kinase II, which indicates increased dopamine release. Non response to a steroid burst has ruled out PANDAS and we are now being told that the Reglan I was prescribed during pregnancy resulted in tardive dyskinesia. I don't want to treat her tics with neuroleptics, as they may have been responsible for her condition. Understanding that Phenylalanine and Tyrosine are precursors to dopamine and that certain amino acids compete with others on common pathways across the blood brain barrier, I was hoping I could supplement with those competing amino acids to "dilute" the dopamine precursors. Can you tell me which amino acids compete with Phenylalanine and Tyrosine to cross the BB barrier?

I have read that L-Tyrosine is a phytoestrogen. A naturopath said that soy, a phytoestrogen, had a negative effect on thyroid function and could also cause problems regarding prostate enlargement / cancer. "If you want a prostate as big as a watermelon, just continue consuming soy!" Could L-Tyrosine have the same possible, unwanted effects?
    We have a different viewpoint regarding soy and we have seen no evidence that reasonable consumption, as part of a diet that has a variety of other foods, cause thyroid problems or prostate problems. L tyrosine is not a phytoestrogen.

I am interested in supplement that has l-tyrosine and l-glutamine combined, are they safe and is it ok to take a multi-vitamin supplement, thyroid complex and biotin with it?
    No simple answers can be given since much depends on the person taking these pills, what health condition they have, other medications used, and the dosage used.

I started taking a small amount of L-Tyrosine and became very sleepy- it felt like a heavy weight right above my eyebrows, and I even had trouble keeping my eyes open during the day. After two days I had to stop taking it, and I can feel the effects lifiting- is this a possible side effect? Also, I am taking Cytomel for my thyroid and I read that it isn't a good idea to take this medication and L-Tyrosine- is that true?
    Most of the time tyrosine causes alertness but unexpected reactions can occur when certain medications are used in combination with dietary supplements.

Can long term use of Phenylalanine and/or Tyrosine lead to ‘Dopamine dysregulation syndrome’, since they convert to and increase L-Dopa? Are there any dangers (for a person free from serious diseases) from the long term use of Phenylalanine and/or Tyrosine? Such as down-regulation of any part of the dopaminergic system. Are withdrawal symptoms possible from such use?
   We have not seen long term studies to give us much clues and it is a good idea to take frequent breaks in order to prevent such potential problems.

 
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